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COSMO’ 21 Schedule

Conference Agenda

All times are US Central = UTC – 5

Monday Aug 2Tuesday Aug 3Wednesday Aug 4Thursday Aug 5Friday Aug 6
8:00 AMPosterPosterPosterPosterPoster
9:00 AMPosterPosterZaldarriaga MeetupSeljak MeetupPoster
9:55 AMWelcome and announcementsAnnouncementsAnnouncementsAnnouncementsAnnouncements
10:00 AMPlenary:
3 talks @ 25+5 min
Gruber Prize CeremonyPlenary:
3 talks @ 25+5 min
Plenary:
3 talks @ 25+5 min
Plenary:
3 talks @ 25+5 min
11:30 AMBreak BreakBreakBreakBreak
11:45 AMParallel Sessions: 
4 talks @ 12+3 min
Parallel Sessions:
4 talks @ 12+3 min
Parallel Sessions:
4 talks @ 12+3 min
Parallel Sessions:
4 talks @ 12+3 min
Plenary:
2 talks @ 25+5min
12:45 PMBreakBreakMentoring PanelsKamionkowski MeetupBreak
1:45 PMPlenary:
2 talks @ 25+5min
Plenary:
2 talks @ 25+5min
Plenary:
2 talks @ 25+5min
Plenary:
2 talks @ 25+5min
Finale:
Videos,  Predictions
2:45 PMBreakBreakBreakBreak
3:00 PMParallel Sessions: 
4 talks @ 12+3 min
Parallel Sessions:
4 talks @ 12+3 min
Parallel Sessions:
4 talks @ 12+3 min
Plenary: 
2 talks @ 25+5min. 
4:00 PMPosterPosterPosterPoster

Plenary Talks

All times are US Central = UTC – 5

DayTimeSpeakerTitleAbstract
Aug 2, Mon10:00 AMPrateek Agrawal, Oxford UniversityCosmology and the Swampland
Aug 2, Mon10:30 AMCliff Burgess, McMaster UniversityInflation: An Opinionated PerspectiveThis talk is meant to be an overview of Inflation, with a focus on what observations are teaching us (and can hope to teach us in future) and on the extent to which theoretical considerations about UV consistency can usefully complement this information.
Aug 2, Mon11:00 AMAnna Ijjas, Albert Einstein InstituteOpen Vistas for Early-Universe CosmologyDuring the past forty years, physical cosmology has seen remarkable advances both in theory and observation. Yet, the subject is far from being done. We still don't have a theory that would resolve the cosmic singularity problem, nor do we have a firm understanding of what constitutes a reliable low-energy effective theory that would describe the early universe or late-time acceleration. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of unsettled issues and novel approaches that are opening up new and exciting research opportunities.
Aug 2, Mon1:45 PMMustafa Amin, Rice UniversityInflation Ends, What’s Next?How did inflation end? How did the hot big bang begin? In this talk, I will first briefly review the rich, nonlinear field dynamics at the end of inflation and generation of gravitational and non-gravitational relics that can provide incisive probes of this era. Then, as concrete case studies, I will focus on the post-inflationary equation-of-state, formation of metastable field configurations (solitons), and their observational consequences. Time permitting, I will point out connections to wave dynamics in contemporary dark matter.
Aug 2, Mon2:15 PMElisa Ferreira, University of São Paulo / MPADark Energy Overview"Our universe is currently going through a period of accelerated
expansion, with evidence of this acceleration coming from many different
observations. There has been a  huge effort to understand and explain
the observed accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this talk, we
will focus on dark energy. We will begin giving an overview of the
evidence for the current accelerated expansion of our universe and map the possible explanations from it, starting from the simplest and observationally preferred, the cosmological constant, to the many that dark energy can have, from phenomenology to field theory, passing by axions. We then describe the theoretical and observational challenges that are faced to explain such a period of accelerated expansion and to construct such models. Finally, we will show how current and future observations are going to be powerful to reveal more about the properties of dark energy and give special attention to novel methods for studying dark energy, motivating and showing the potential of looking more broadly than the traditional observables."
Aug 3, Tues1:45 PMClaudia de Rham, Imperial CollegeEffective Field Theories of Gravitation"The recent direct detection of gravitational waves marks the beginning of a new era for physics and astronomy with an opportunity the probe gravity at its most fundamental level. I will discuss how the effective behaviour of gravity on various scales may impact early and late-time cosmology, the various theoretical and observational constraints that exist on any gravitational effective field theory as well as the potential signatures on the spectrum of gravitational waves observable at LIGO and LISA."
Aug 3, Tues2:15 PMDaniel Holz, University of ChicagoRecent results in gravitational-wave scienceWe'll provide an overview of the entirely new field of gravitational-wave astrophysics. We will focus on recent developments, including constraints that come from the detected population of gravitational-wave events. Topics will include the lower (between neutron stars and black holes) and the upper (due to pair-instability supernovae) mass gaps, standard siren cosmology, and the latest events including GW190814 (with a secondary object that might be a neutron star or a black hole; we're not sure which), GW190521 (with two black holes potentially in the pair-instability mass gap), and GW200105 and GW200115 (neutron-star black hole coalescences).
Aug 4, Wed10:00 AMTakahiro Tanaka, Kyoto UniversityTesting gravity using gravitational wavesI will discuss the attempts and difficulties of construction of templates of gravitational waves from inspiraling binaries taking into account possible extension of general relativity. After introducing some results which can be used for the actual data analyses, I'd like to explain what kind of theoretical investigation is necessary for the further detailed test of gravity.
Aug 4, Wed10:30 AMDjuna Croon, Durham UniversityGravitatinal Wave Probes of Dark Matter
Aug 4, Wed11:00 AMAnne Green, University of NottinghamPrimordial Black Holes as a dark matter candidate" Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are black holes formed in the early Universe, for instance from the collapse of large density perturbations generated by inflation. The discovery of gravitational waves from mergers of ~10 Solar mass black hole binaries has led to increased interest in PBHs as a dark matter candidate. I will review the formation of PBHs, and the observational limits on their abundance."
Aug 4, Wed1:45 PMSarah Burke-Spolator, West Virginia UniversityAstrophysics and Cosmology from NanoGrav
Aug 4, Wed2:15 PMElisabeth Krause, University of ArizonaRecent cosmology results from the Dark Energy Survey"Over the next decade, large galaxy surveys will map billions of galaxies and probe cosmic structure formation with high statistical precision. This talk will focus on the opportunities and challenges of cosmological analyses in the presence of complex systematic effects, using recent results from the Dark Energy Survey as pathfinder examples. In particular, I will describe different cosmological probes measured from DES data and summarize recent analyses combining galaxy clustering, weak lensing, cluster clustering and cluster abundances, as well as constraints on baryons and galaxy biasing from small scales."
Aug 5, Thur10:00 AMAlexandre Barreira, LMU MunichGalaxy bias and the consequences for tests of the early Universe"""Galaxy bias"" describes the relation between the formation of galaxies and their large-scale environment, and studying it leads not only to improved cosmological constraints using galaxy data, but invariably also to new insights about the astrophysics of the galaxy-environment connection. In this talk I will go through a number of recent advances made in our ability to make predictions for galaxy bias using hydrodynamical galaxy formation simulations, and what these new results have been telling us about the environmental dependence of galaxy formation. I will also discuss why developing a robust knowledge of galaxy bias is crucial to the goal of future galaxy surveys to test cosmology in general, and in particular, to test models of the early Universe through searches for primordial non-Gaussianity and isocurvature."
Aug 5, Thur10:30 AMRisa Wechsler, Stanford/KIPACDark Matter Physics from Galaxies
Aug 5, Thur11:00 AMW.L. Kimmy Wu, SLACLatest Constraints on Inflation from the CMB
Aug 5, Thur1:45 PMIsobel Hook, Lancaster UniversityCosmology with supernovae: status and future prospects"I will review the current status of cosmological measurements resulting from the use of Type Ia supernovae as standard candles.  I will describe some recent and on-going supernova surveys and expected contributions to the field in the near future. I will also discuss the limiting factors in the cosmological measurements from supernovae and the developments that are required in order to make further progress. Finally, I will discuss the exciting prospects for future major new surveys that are being planned, with specific reference to the Rubin Observatory's Legacy Survey of Space and Time (LSST), the Euclid mission, the 4MOST instrument and the Roman Space Telescope."
Aug 5, Thur2:15 PMMarius Millea, UC BerkeleyCMB and Neff
Aug 5, Thur3:00 PMRachel Beaton, Princeton UniversityLocal Measurements of H0
Aug 5, Thur3:30Katherine Freese, University of Texas
Chain Inflation and Chain Early Dark Energy "In both Chain inflation and Chain Early Energy (EDE), the universe tunnels from a high energy minimum through a series of first order phase transitions to ever lower minima. The potential has a series of N local minima and may be modeled by a tilted cosine; the field tunnels its way through the barriers down this tilted cosine. In inflation, the tunneling through each stage is rapid enough (less than one e-folding per step) that percolation and reheating from the phase transition are achieved. Such a quasiperiodic potential is ubiquitous in axion physics and, therefore, carries strong theoretical motivation. Further this model is interesting in the context of the 10^500 vacua of the string theory landscape, e.g. where the series of tunneling events may be characterized by quantized changes in four form fluxes. A similar series of tunneling events later in the Universe at z≃3500, Chain EDE, can provide a solution to the Hubble tension in cosmology, the apparent discrepancy between local measurements of the Hubble constant H0≃74 km s−1Mpc−1 and H0≃67 km s−1 Mpc−1 inferred from the Cosmic Microwave Background. As in all EDE models, the contribution of the vacuum energy to the total energy density of the universe is initially negligible, but reaches ∼10% around matter-radiation equality, before cosmological data require it to redshift away quickly -- at least as fast as radiation."
Aug 6, Fri10:00 AMNikita Blinov, FermilabThe (Really) Small Scale Structure of Dark Matter"The statistical properties of dark matter (DM) on the largest scales in the universe are well described by the standard cosmological model. In contrast, comparatively little is known about the DM distribution within galaxies. I will discuss how early universe cosmological evolution and DM microphysics can result in enhanced structure, i.e. clumpiness, on sub-galactic scales. Using the examples of vector DM produced during inflation and a universe with a period of pre-nucleosynthesis matter domination, I will show how we can relate the microphysical parameters in these models (such as particle masses and lifetimes) to the late-time properties of gravitationally-bound DM clumps called microhalos. Observation of microhalos can give us insight into the pre-nucleosynthesis universe, and the particle nature and origin of DM."
Aug 6, Fri10:30 AMElisa Chisari, Utrecht UniversityCosmology with weak gravitational lensing"As the light from distant galaxies travels to our telescopes, photons suffer alterations in their direction of propagation due to fluctuations in the density of matter in the Universe. As a consequence, observed galaxy shapes are, on average, weakly distorted from the original ones. This phenomenon, predicted by General Relativity, is now regularly observed to high precision and has matured as a cosmological probe of the growth of structure and the expansion history of the Universe. In particular, it is key to unveiling the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this talk, I will give an overview of the status of weak gravitational lensing measurements and their modelling in the context of ongoing astronomical surveys. I will also discuss some of the main challenges associated with extracting information from this observable, and illustrate the ongoing preparations towards enabling weak lensing studies with the Vera C. Rubin Observatory and other upcoming facilities. "
Aug 6, Fri11:00 AMFrancesca Calore, CNRSGamma-ray particle astrophysics"Gamma-ray particle astrophysics has been flourishing in the last
decade, thanks also to the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi satellite. Launched in 2009, it has revolutionized our way to conceive high-energy emission processes for gamma-ray production through the discovery of new high-energy gamma-ray sources as well as the characterization of diffuse emission at large scales. In my presentation, I will review the state-of-the-art of high-energy gamma-ray emission, with a special focus on long-standing ""excesses"" discovered in gamma ray data and on how their nature can be probed in the coming years. I will notably illustrate the case of the so-called Fermi GeV excess, why this has been quite exciting for dark matter searches, and how we can tackle the challenge of unveiling its nature with multi-messenger and multi-wavelength observations."
Aug 6, Fri11:45 AMKeith Olive, University of MinnesotaRecent updates to Big Bang Nucleosynthesis."Big bang nucleosynthesis provides a window to the physics of the universe just seconds after the big bang. It predictions of the light element abundances of D, 4 He, and 7 Li can be compared with observational determinations. Over the last several years, significant progress has been made on several fronts. First and foremost, results from Planck measurements of the microwave background have provided precise values for the baryon density of the universe, a key input used in abundance predictions. We now have good precision on Deuterium abundance determinations, and a path towards significant improvements in Helium determinations.  Finally, recent nuclear cross section data and its effect on BBN precision is also discussed."
Aug 6, Fri12:15 PMMansi Kasliwal, CaltechMultimessenger Astrophysics"I will review recent results in multi-messenger astronomy, including both efforts to study electromagnetic counterparts to LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave triggers and ICECUBE high energy neutrino triggers. I will conclude with the new frontiers to look forward to in the coming decade."

Parallel Talks